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Northwestern at AAAS

From Picasso's creative process to electronic wearable technology

Showcasing a broad spectrum of cutting-edge research and scientific advances, 10 Northwestern University faculty members presented their work at the 2018 meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Feb. 15-19 in Austin, Texas.

The diverse body of research ranges from breakthrough inventions in the field of soft electronic wearables for the human body to technology-enabled insights into the composition of Picasso paintings and sculptures. The presentations examine the intersection between art and science, research and discovery, and in many cases, challenge conventional wisdom.

Presentations shed light on nanotechnology, the relationship between music and the brain, the tradeoffs of high-yield crops in west Africa, why “SuperAgers” maintain strong cognitive abilities much longer than their peers and the potential benefits when universities collaborate with the U.S. Department of Defense.

Highlights

Uncovering hidden Picasso details

An international partnership between Northwestern, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Art Gallery of Ontario and the National Gallery of Art has used multiple modes of light to uncover details hidden beneath the visible surface of Pablo Picasso’s painting "The Crouching Woman," a major work from the artist’s Blue Period. Read more >

Related story: Unprecedented study of Picasso's bronzes uncovers new details

Wearable is a rehab game changer

A groundbreaking new wearable for the throat could be a game changer in stroke rehabilitation. Developed in the lab of engineering professor John Rogers, in partnership with Shirley Ryan AbilityLab, the sensor is the latest in Rogers’ growing portfolio of stretchable electronics. Read more >

Presenters

Mohammad Ahmadpoor

Mohammad Ahmadpoor

Examining data from 4.8 million U.S. patents and 32 million research articles to illuminate the relationship between patents and citation linkages. Abstract

Aggelos Katsaggelos

Aggelos Katsaggelos

A look at new technologies used to visualize the hidden works beneath some of Picasso’s Blue Period paintings. Abstract

Neil Kelleher

Neil Kelleher

His analysis of whole protein molecules leads to the examination of protein sequences, mutations and modifications in unprecedented detail. Abstract

Nina Kraus

Nina Kraus

Her presentation on music for brain health looks at how music strengthens sound processing, while concussions disrupt this delicate brain circuitry. Abstract

Amanda Logan

Amanda Logan

She will discuss the tradeoffs of adopting high-yield crops in Ghana. Her study shows yield is a short-term benefit with unintended costs. Abstract

Chad Mirkin

Chad Mirkin

He will examine how collaborations between universities and the U.S. Department of Defense can help science address society’s greatest challenges. Abstract

Julio Ottino

Julio Ottino

Using examples from Galileo and Picasso, he will show how artistic creativity reveals processes that hold valuable lessons in science and technology. Abstract

Emily Rogalski

Emily Rogalski

Her research on “SuperAgers” sheds light on individuals seemingly resistant to the deleterious memory changes of typical cognitive aging. Abstract

John Rogers

John Rogers

Showcasing new silicon-based electronic wearables his lab developed to aid stroke patients in their rehab. Abstract

Marc Walton, Francesca Casadio

Marc Walton, Francesca Casadio

Walton, Casadio and colleagues can visualize hidden works beneath some of Picasso’s paintings and analyze bronze compositions. Abstract

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Published: February 14, 2018. Updated: February 17, 2018.

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