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Special Feature

October 11, 2017

Welcoming the Class of 2021

'They look great in purple'

Northwestern University welcomed the Class of 2021 to campus this fall. The breadth of their experiences and backgrounds makes this as diverse and accomplished as any incoming class in the University's history. “These students were not admitted to Northwestern because they're perfect, or merely because of their excellent grades and test scores," said Chris Watson, dean of undergraduate admission. "Each individual was admitted because our committee thought they would contribute to our community. And, of course, they all look great in purple!"

Wildcat Welcome

I hope you look back on choosing Northwestern as one of the greatest decisions of your life.”

President Morton Schapiro,
greeting new and transfer students

Our Community

Scholars, researchers and artists

They come to Northwestern from more than 70 countries, speaking 50 different languages. Closer to home, 127 students graduated from Chicago public high schools in 54 different neighborhoods. And 30 are from Evanston itself. The Class of 2021 includes scientists, musicians, entrepreneurs, athletes, volunteers, authors, researchers and more. Meet a few of them.

Delia Cunningham

Delia Cunningham

Used a gap year last year to work in the touring production of playwright Arthur Miller’s “A View From the Bridge.” “There’s no greater way to bring people together than asking them to sit in the dark with one another and witness.”

John Nguyen

John Nguyen

The QuestBridge Scholar plans to pursue computer science. But he also plays jazz, rock and electronic music. His love of music has driven him to help children in his hometown outside Oklahoma City. “Having a mentor and being one can greatly change the direction of one’s life.”

Selin Yazici

Selin Yazici

Founded a “young group of talents” in her native Turkey so her friends could perform dance and music while supporting local charities. “I love being where the energy is. If the idea is 50 percent of the future, the initiative is the other 50 percent to accomplish it.”

Michael Bump

Michael Bump

Ask about his coin-filled “bag of shame” and he’ll tell you the penny is an inefficiency and a drain on taxpayers. “I want to be an industrial engineer so I can tackle small, targeted issues to improve inefficiencies in people’s everyday lives.”

Meron Amariw

Meron Amariw

After doctors found a cyst on her brain, it sparked her interest in studying neuroscience. She credits her family outside Atlanta with providing her the inspiration to pursue her passions no matter what the field. And as a college football fan, she’ll be a regular at Ryan Field this fall.

By the Numbers

class of 2021 graphics 8

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