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‘Democratic Party seems intent on falling back on rhetoric straight out of the Clinton-era,’ expert says

EVANSTON, Ill. --- Northwestern University political science professors are available to discuss the run-off elections in Georgia and the presidential transition.

For media inquiries contact Stephanie Kulke at stephanie.kulke@northwestern.edu or reach out directly to the faculty experts below.

Alvin B. Tillery Jr. is an associate professor of political science. His research and teaching interests are in the fields of American politics and political theory. His research focuses on American political development, racial and ethnic politics, and media and politics. He can be reached at alvin.tillery@northwestern.edu.

Quote from Professor Tillery
“The Georgia runoff election on January 5th is going to determine the balance of power in our federal government. If the Democrats can flip these seats it will provide President-elect Biden with a unified government when he is sworn into office in January 2021.

“What is so surprising is how many Democrats in Congress have entered into the public sphere over the last several days with messaging condemning the Black Lives Matter movement and urging the party to evaluate its appeal to white working-class voters. It was the resurgent Obama coalition — with a hyper-mobilization of Black voters that defeated Donald Trump in Georgia. The Democrats will need these same voters to return to the polls again if they are to gain Senate control, yet the Democratic Party seems intent on ignoring this reality and falling back on rhetoric straight out of the Clinton-era.” 

Jaime Dominguez is an associate professor in the department of political science and the Latino/a studies program. His research interests include race and ethnicity, coalition politics and urban and minority politics. He can be reached at j-dominguez@northwestern.edu

Quote from Professor Dominguez
“While President Trump can continue to seek legal challenges to the outcome of the Nov. 3 election, it is of the utmost importance the transition of power not be held up, further delayed or jeopardized. This is why President-elect Biden must be immediately brought into national security and intelligence briefings so that he and his governing team can begin to put in place measures to deal with issues such as the COVID-19 crisis, foreign policy matters and other threats. Ensuring a smooth transfer of power is critical for the continuity of governance. It is in the national interest of America that there be cooperation.”