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Special Feature

April 21, 2017

At Northwestern, we march for science every day

“Northwestern’s relentless pursuit of excellence is not just about science — it is about harnessing the power of knowledge to change the world. The hallmark of Northwestern is our brilliant scholars and researchers. Their journey — marked by risk, trial and success — fuels the discoveries that begin to solve some of society’s biggest challenges and lead to economic growth and prosperity. At this moment in time, when what we champion most is threatened, we must rally to its defense. I invite you to march with Northwestern and raise your voice, with me, every day, for science.”
- Northwestern President Morton Schapiro

Champion for Research

University works diligently to support research and oppose budget cuts

Northwestern is advocating on multiple fronts for the importance of funding for medical and scientific research — and the imperative of protecting its students and scholars — amid great uncertainty over budget cuts, immigration law and education policies in Washington, D.C.

Health

Today's breakthroughs, tomorrow's cures

From the development of life-changing drugs to the creation of wearable technology, Northwestern researchers drive the evolution of modern medicine. The commitment of benefactors Louis Simpson and Kimberly Querrey to We Will. The Campaign for Northwestern has helped cement Northwestern's reputation as a leader in biomedical research.

Menstrual cycle in a dish

Menstrual cycle in a dish

Northwestern Medicine develops a miniature, personalized reproductive system that will test drugs for safety and effectiveness in women.

 

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Alzheimer’s breakthrough

Alzheimer’s breakthrough

Northwestern Medicine shows SuperAgers’ brains shrink much slower than their age-matched peers, resulting in a greater resistance to “typical” memory loss and dementia.

 

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Lab on the skin

Lab on the skin

Engineers develop a low-cost wearable electronic device that can collect and analyze sweat for health monitoring.

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 Picturing precision medicine

Picturing precision medicine

These days it's not unusual to start with millions of files from an electronic data warehouse to shape the treatment of individual patients.

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Blockbuster drug developed at Northwestern

Blockbuster drug developed at Northwestern

Chemist Richard Silverman developed pregabalin, the small molecule that Pfizer now markets as Lyrica.

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Universal solution for regenerative medicine

Universal solution for regenerative medicine

Revolutionary nanomaterials developed at Northwestern could make it possible to repair any part of the body.

 

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Numbers

90school-based research centers

50+university research centers

$650 millionin sponsored research in 2016

Fundamental Science

Crossing disciplines to find solutions

Discoveries made at Northwestern are shaping the future of scientific research. The creation of molecular machines — recognized with the 2016 Nobel Prize in Chemistry — and the detection of gravitational waves 100 years after Albert Einstein’s prediction, are just two examples of the work fueling scientific inquiry for generations to come.

Promising biomaterial to build better bones

Promising biomaterial to build better bones

Northwestern researchers have developed a 3-D printable ink that produces a synthetic bone implant that rapidly induces bone regeneration and growth.

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Nobel Prize in Chemistry

Nobel Prize in Chemistry

Last year’s Nobel Prize in Chemistry was shared by Northwestern professor Sir Fraser Stoddart, whose fundamental research has had a tremendous impact on science.

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Innovators join to fight cancer

Innovators join to fight cancer

Chad Mirkin and Leonidas Platanias bring their skills, research enterprises and personal stories together to battle cancer in innovative, sub-microscopic ways.

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When does aging really begin?

When does aging really begin?

Two Northwestern scientists have found that adult cells abruptly begin their downhill slide when an animal reaches reproductive maturity.

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A discovery for the ages

A discovery for the ages

Northwestern astrophysicists are part of the first team to detect gravitational waves, proving Einstein’s century-old theory of general relativity. 

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Synthetic biologists engineer living systems to tackle global problems

Synthetic biologists engineer living systems to tackle global problems

“We have a newfound ability to read, write and edit DNA, the code of life," says Michael Jewett, a leading synthetic biologist who is engineering living systems to help eradicate pervasive disease.

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Energy & Climate

Ideas with global impact

Northwestern researchers are working together to protect the planet for future generations, and a recent gift from benefactors Jeff and Laurie Ubben will establish the Ubben Program for Climate and Carbon Science. The focus is on science that enables clean energy, green living and planetary responsibility.

Arctic meltdown?

Arctic meltdown?

Polar geologist Yarrow Axford will share her perspective on climate change at a lecture April 26 in Chicago.

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Supercharged: better batteries ahead

Supercharged: better batteries ahead

From anode to the cathode — and everything in between — Northwestern researchers are finding ways to make cheaper, lighter batteries that work better and last longer.

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The ultimate green house

The ultimate green house

House by Northwestern is the University's first entry in the Department of Energy Solar Decathlon and a showcase of sustainable living.

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Engine for progress

University research is awe inspiring

The world is full of puzzles, problems and wonders. It’s only through an ever-deeper understanding of the physical world, the biological world and the human world that we overcome challenges and can advance.”

Jay Walsh, vice president for research,
on the value of investing in transformative ideas

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