Skip to main content

FoodSwitch

App rates nutritional value of packaged foods, suggests better products, crowdsources new info

DOWNLOAD VIDEO
(Credit: Northwestern University)

 

FoodSwitch photos

Reviewing yogurt nutrition in app
Download Image

Reviewing yogurt nutrition in app:  A user reviews the nutritional information of a yogurt using the traffic light rating within the FoodSwitch app. (Credit: Northwestern University)

Reading healthier alternatives in app
Download Image

Reading healthier alternatives in app: A user scrolls through the healthier options that FoodSwitch provided after they scanned the barcode of a packaged food. (Credit: Northwestern University) 

Reviewing star mode nutritional rating
Download Image

Reviewing star mode nutritional rating: A user reviews the nutritional information of a breakfast cereal using the star mode rating within the FoodSwitch app. (Credit: Northwestern University) 

Scanning barcode using app
Download Image

Scanning barcode using app: A user scans the barcode of a salad dressing using FoodSwitch. (Credit: Northwestern University) 

Taking photo for app database
Download Image

Taking photo for app database: A FoodSwitch user takes a photo of the nutritional panel on a jar of marinara sauce. If FoodSwitch doesn't recognize a packaged food, it asks the user to take photos of the barcode, label, nutritional panel and ingredients in an effort to crowdsource the new product information. (Credit: Northwestern University) 

A person in a grocery store photographing a nutritional panel using the FoodSwitch app.
Download Image

App requests a photo of nutritional panel: If FoodSwitch doesn't recognize a packaged food, it asks the user to take photos of the barcode, label, nutritional panel and ingredients in an effort to crowdsource the new product information. (Credit: Northwestern University) 

FoodSwitch screenshots

A row of screenshot illustrations from the app
Download Image

How the app crowdsources new information: If FoodSwitch doesn't recognize a product, it will ask the user to "help us out" by taking a photo of the food's barcode, front of the package, nutrition panel and ingredient list. (Credit: Northwestern University)

Scanning hot dogs using the app's 'SaltSwitch' filter
Download Image

Scanning hot dogs using the app's 'SaltSwitch' filter: The "SaltSwitch" filter within the FoodSwitch app allows users on a salt-restricted diet to filter out products that are high in sodium. Hot dogs, as seen here, are very high in salt, and the app suggest switching to a different food category altogether. (Credit: Northwestern University) 

'SaltSwitch' scanning a no-salt chip
Download Image

'SaltSwitch' scanning a no-salt chip: When FoodSwitch scanned this bag of "no-salt" potato chips using the "SaltSwitch" filter, it reflected that there was, indeed, no salt in the product. It also could not recommend a healthier alternative with lower salt. (Credit: Northwestern University)

Comparing chips using app's 'Compare' feature
Download Image

Comparing chips using app's 'Compare' feature: The FoodSwitch app allows users to compare similar products to quickly see which one is healthier. The app scanned two bags of chips and displayed them in order of healthiness in its comparison. (Credit: Northwestern University)

FoodSwitch infographics

Interview video

Abigail Baldridge, Northwestern Medicine biostatistician and FoodSwitch USA collaborator

Screen Shot 2018 06 22 at 12.38.40 AMDOWNLOAD VIDEO
Abigail Baldridge: Why crowdsourcing new food information is important
(Credit: Northwestern University)

Screen Shot 2018 06 22 at 11.38.18 AMDOWNLOAD VIDEO
Abigail Baldridge explains FoodSwitch
(Credit: Northwestern University) 

Dr. Mark Huffman, Northwestern Medicine cardiologist and FoodSwitch USA co-lead

Screen Shot 2018 06 22 at 12.44.42 AMDOWNLOAD VIDEO
Mark Huffman: A cardiologist's perspective on poor nutrition 
(Credit: Northwestern University)

 

Screen Shot 2018 06 22 at 12.45.49 AMDOWNLOAD VIDEO
Mark Huffman explains FoodSwitch
(Credit: Northwestern University)

 

Broll video

Screen Shot 2018 06 22 at 12.50.49 AMDOWNLOAD VIDEO
(Credit: Northwestern University)

Back to top